news.mn

Мэдээллийн эх сурвалж. Монголын өдөр тутмын мэдээллийн хамгийн том вэб сайт. ...

Display Widget for this domain on your website. Click Here
Processing update domain...

Overview Info

  • Domain Name
    news.mn
  • Favicon
  • Alexa Rank
    #9242
  • Google Page Rank
    PR 5
  • Ip Address
    218.100.84.150
  • Page Size
    165.5 KB
  • Images
    11 GIF, 37 JPG, 1 PNG
  • Heading
    H1 H2 H3 H4 H5 H6
    0 0 0 0 0 0

Website Meta Analysis



  • Title
    www.news.mn | Мэдээллийн эх сурвалж
  • Meta Keyword
    мэдээ, улс төр, бизнес, мэдээлэл, шуурхай, өдөр тутмын, news, politics, mongolia, mongolian news
  • Meta Description
    Мэдээллийн эх сурвалж. Монголын өдөр тутмын мэдээллийн хамгийн том вэб сайт.

Technical Analysis



  • Webserver
    nginx/1.1.19
  • Ip Address
    218.100.84.150
  • Domain Age
  • Javascript Library
    jquery, yui
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from news.mn.

HTML Analysis

  • server: nginx/1.1.19
  • date: Fri, 07 Jun 2013 03:23:22 GMT
  • content-type: text/html;charset=UTF-8
  • connection: keep-alive
  • expires: Fri, 07 Jun 2013 03:28:22 GMT
  • cache-control: max-age=300
  • content-language: en-US
  • content-encoding: gzip
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA
No data whois for news.mn

DNS Analysis


DNS servers
ns2.delgertech.com
ns1.delgertech.com [180.149.96.17]

DNS Records

Answer records
news.mn SOA
server: ns1.delgertech.com
email: support@delgertech.com
serial: 2012050205
refresh: 7200
retry: 3600
expire: 604800
minimum ttl: 3600
36000s
news.mn NS  ns1.delgertech.com 36000s
news.mn NS  ns2.delgertech.com 36000s
news.mn MX
preference: 10
exchange: mail.adsolux.com
36000s
news.mn A 202.170.64.44 36000s
news.mn TXT v=spf1 a mx ?all 36000s

Authority records

Additional records

IP 218.100.84.150 Analysis

  • Country Code
  • Country Code3
  • Country Name
  • City
  • Continent Code
  • Latitude
  • Longitude
  • No whois ip data for 218.100.84.150

Site Same Ip

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 65 Errors
  • 57 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.5358088933727441
Message Error
  • Error Line 26, Column 13: there is no attribute "XMLNS"
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:og="http://ogp.me/ns#">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 26, Column 53: there is no attribute "XMLNS:OG"
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:og="http://ogp.me/ns#">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Warning Line 43, Column 67: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 45, Column 123: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ef="http://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/root.css?4"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 45, Column 123: document type does not allow element "LINK" here
    …ef="http://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/root.css?4"/>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 48, Column 118: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ref="http://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/comp/share-tools.css?1"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 48, Column 118: document type does not allow element "LINK" here
    …ref="http://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/comp/share-tools.css?1"/>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 49, Column 113: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ss" href="http://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/comp/follow.css?3"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 49, Column 113: document type does not allow element "LINK" here
    …ss" href="http://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/comp/follow.css?3"/>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 61, Column 146: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …rces.info/jscripts/jquery/fancybox/jquery.fancybox-1.3.4.css" media="screen" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 61, Column 146: document type does not allow element "LINK" here
    …rces.info/jscripts/jquery/fancybox/jquery.fancybox-1.3.4.css" media="screen" />

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 63, Column 112: document type does not allow element "META" here
    …"Мэдээллийн эх сурвалж. Монголын өдөр тутмын мэдээллийн хамгийн том вэб сайт.">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 64, Column 129: document type does not allow element "META" here
    …нес, мэдээлэл, шуурхай, өдөр тутмын, news, politics, mongolia, mongolian news">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 65, Column 100: document type does not allow element "LINK" here
    …con" href="http://static.newsresources.info/style/new.ico" type="image/x-icon">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 99, Column 28: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
         <style type="text/css">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 111, Column 7: end tag for element "HEAD" which is not open
    </head>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 112, Column 33: document type does not allow element "BODY" here
    <body id="body" onload="isIE();">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 214, Column 48: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                        <input type="text" name="q"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 220, Column 155: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ww.news.mn/archive.shtml';" checked="checked" value="all"/>news.mn &nbsp;&nbsp;

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 221, Column 126: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …searchForm.action='http://www.baabar.mn/search.shtml';"/>baabar.mn &nbsp;&nbsp;

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 222, Column 128: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …"document.searchForm.action='http://archive.news.mn/google.shtml';"/>google.com

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 257, Column 95: cannot generate system identifier for general entity "site"
    …  <a class="" href="http://archive.news.mn/archive.shtml?q=&site=all">Архив</a>

    An entity reference was found in the document, but there is no reference by that name defined. Often this is caused by misspelling the reference name, unencoded ampersands, or by leaving off the trailing semicolon (;). The most common cause of this error is unencoded ampersands in URLs as described by the WDG in "Ampersands in URLs".

    Entity references start with an ampersand (&) and end with a semicolon (;). If you want to use a literal ampersand in your document you must encode it as "&amp;" (even inside URLs!). Be careful to end entity references with a semicolon or your entity reference may get interpreted in connection with the following text. Also keep in mind that named entity references are case-sensitive; &Aelig; and &aelig; are different characters.

    If this error appears in some markup generated by PHP's session handling code, this article has explanations and solutions to your problem.

    Note that in most documents, errors related to entity references will trigger up to 5 separate messages from the Validator. Usually these will all disappear when the original problem is fixed.

  • Error Line 257, Column 95: general entity "site" not defined and no default entity
    …  <a class="" href="http://archive.news.mn/archive.shtml?q=&site=all">Архив</a>

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Error Line 257, Column 99: reference to entity "site" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …  <a class="" href="http://archive.news.mn/archive.shtml?q=&site=all">Архив</a>

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 257, Column 94: entity was defined here
    …  <a class="" href="http://archive.news.mn/archive.shtml?q=&site=all">Архив</a>
  • Error Line 378, Column 45: document type does not allow element "DIV" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                        <div style="clear:both;"></div>
  • Error Line 396, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 409, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 422, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 435, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 448, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 461, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 474, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 487, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 500, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 513, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 526, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 539, Column 51: document type does not allow element "SPAN" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
                                <span class="menu-sep"></span>
  • Error Line 574, Column 43: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
                        <style type="text/css">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 706, Column 90: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/></a>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 706, Column 90: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/></a>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 765, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2012/7/778f11a426290657/be1ef5407ea55470great.jpg" style="width:54px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 765, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2012/7/778f11a426290657/be1ef5407ea55470great.jpg" style="width:54px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 813, Column 132: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …to/2012/10/6593afbce3a6bffe/9632feeb5bfce706great.jpg" style="height:50px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 813, Column 132: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …to/2012/10/6593afbce3a6bffe/9632feeb5bfce706great.jpg" style="height:50px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 861, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …to/2012/10/9ee74f8fff8acd78/5a869016e2ba84c8great.jpg" style="height:50px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 861, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …to/2012/10/9ee74f8fff8acd78/5a869016e2ba84c8great.jpg" style="height:50px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 945, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …oto/2010/12/75e8405943dd4dd2/b740f0ba0014d2bsmall.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 945, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …oto/2010/12/75e8405943dd4dd2/b740f0ba0014d2bsmall.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 974, Column 86: document type does not allow element "DIV" here; missing one of "APPLET", "OBJECT", "MAP", "IFRAME", "BUTTON" start-tag
    …                                                   <div class="play-btn"></div>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Warning Line 985, Column 133: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …oto/2013/2/2dc050ec6a91f36c/6dfe0adfa5c3160csmall.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 985, Column 133: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …oto/2013/2/2dc050ec6a91f36c/6dfe0adfa5c3160csmall.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1025, Column 137: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …2012/11/124ca24ffe3dee82/c74fce0bc7510697original.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1025, Column 137: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2012/11/124ca24ffe3dee82/c74fce0bc7510697original.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1065, Column 134: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/b0ea937d6b16c807/ec8205a5ff8de922original.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1065, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/b0ea937d6b16c807/ec8205a5ff8de922original.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1105, Column 138: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/b1fd7dbdd4564c8b/29d6efa3dc2b3956original.png" style="width:121px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1105, Column 138: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/b1fd7dbdd4564c8b/29d6efa3dc2b3956original.png" style="width:121px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1145, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …oto/2011/4/5e8c1ea2f0233634/70b7fe63e2c3becfsmall.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1145, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …oto/2011/4/5e8c1ea2f0233634/70b7fe63e2c3becfsmall.jpg" style="width:121px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1174, Column 86: document type does not allow element "DIV" here; missing one of "APPLET", "OBJECT", "MAP", "IFRAME", "BUTTON" start-tag
    …                                                   <div class="play-btn"></div>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Warning Line 1185, Column 133: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …oto/2013/2/c44ace5b81e4db3e/21b8f85636eadf06small.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1185, Column 133: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …oto/2013/2/c44ace5b81e4db3e/21b8f85636eadf06small.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1225, Column 136: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2012/4/c49bb6758ee87425/8ecda3844c133884original.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1225, Column 136: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2012/4/c49bb6758ee87425/8ecda3844c133884original.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1265, Column 137: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/9d25251efd49448d/7382e52fced3867boriginal.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1265, Column 137: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/9d25251efd49448d/7382e52fced3867boriginal.jpg" style="height:70px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1374, Column 93: there is no attribute "DATA-BUTTON"
    …s="twitter-follow-button" data-button="grey" data-text-color="#FFFFFF" data-li…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 1374, Column 116: there is no attribute "DATA-TEXT-COLOR"
    …n" data-button="grey" data-text-color="#FFFFFF" data-link-color="#00AEFF" data…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 1374, Column 142: there is no attribute "DATA-LINK-COLOR"
    …-text-color="#FFFFFF" data-link-color="#00AEFF" data-show-count="false">Follow…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 1374, Column 168: there is no attribute "DATA-SHOW-COUNT"
    …"#FFFFFF" data-link-color="#00AEFF" data-show-count="false">Follow @News_mn</a>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Warning Line 1387, Column 136: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …m/TsogtgerelB/status/299047985185169409" target="_blank">Цогоо гуай нь</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1414, Column 127: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …witter.com/shinee2016/status/304389048083025921" target="_blank">Шинээ</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1441, Column 129: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tter.com/bat_ts/status/304391477532975104" target="_blank">БАТ ИНЖЕНЕР</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1468, Column 131: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …er.com/altanalim/status/304443868345147392" target="_blank">Altan Alim</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1495, Column 144: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ikhan_dr/status/304243049310085120" target="_blank">Boldsaikhan Bundan</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1522, Column 126: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …twitter.com/Naran_t/status/304242777263316994" target="_blank">T.Naran</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1549, Column 137: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/serchmaa_s/status/304444942292488192" target="_blank">Sambuu Serchmaa</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1576, Column 140: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …khboldz/status/304445208622399488" target="_blank">Zandaakhuu Enkhbold</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1603, Column 131: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …er.com/BBoldoo/status/304444590335877121" target="_blank">Bold Batsukh</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1630, Column 139: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …rangoo_A/status/304450277749186560" target="_blank">Urangoo Altangerel</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1657, Column 128: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …itter.com/Mona_Tb/status/304450074149265409" target="_blank">Мөнхнаран</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1684, Column 132: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …r.com/tsoomoococktail/status/304449636230385664" target="_blank">tsoom</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1711, Column 127: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …witter.com/UndaraaE/status/304449110705065984" target="_blank">Ишдулам</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1738, Column 132: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …r.com/tsoomoococktail/status/304449103700582400" target="_blank">tsoom</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1765, Column 128: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …itter.com/TulgaBe/status/304448501683724288" target="_blank">TuLGaMind</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1792, Column 126: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …twitter.com/Tungaa26/status/304447884693217280" target="_blank">Тунгаа</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1819, Column 137: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/Enkhsaikhan_PM/status/304447507314917377" target="_blank">Enkhsaikhan</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1846, Column 128: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …itter.com/DoNjToi/status/304447342680092673" target="_blank">Сонин Хүн</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1873, Column 133: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    ….com/A3XVV/status/304447159560966144" target="_blank">A3XVV MUNKHBAYAR</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1900, Column 130: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ter.com/nomingobi/status/304445921696030720" target="_blank">Номинговь</a><br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 2190, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 2190, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 2526, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 2526, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 2610, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 2610, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 2638, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 2638, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 3002, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 3002, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 3058, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 3058, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 3170, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 3170, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 3398, Column 158: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/photo.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 3398, Column 158: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/photo.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 4764, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 4764, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 4828, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 4828, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 4892, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 4892, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 4956, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 4956, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 5309, Column 150: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 5309, Column 150: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 5373, Column 150: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 5373, Column 150: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 5501, Column 150: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 5501, Column 150: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 5757, Column 150: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 5757, Column 150: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6056, Column 158: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6056, Column 158: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6089, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6089, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6409, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6409, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6568, Column 158: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6568, Column 158: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6665, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6665, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6696, Column 158: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6696, Column 158: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6857, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6857, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 6985, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 6985, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 7241, Column 154: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 7241, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 7464, Column 158: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 7464, Column 158: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8332, Column 134: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2011/4/5e8c1ea2f0233634/70b7fe63e2c3becftiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8332, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2011/4/5e8c1ea2f0233634/70b7fe63e2c3becftiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8382, Column 134: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2013/2/105fd1e49d5ff5ba/6d8763381f6ca25ftiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8382, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2013/2/105fd1e49d5ff5ba/6d8763381f6ca25ftiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8515, Column 133: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …oto/2012/10/844b537e76dd318f/c8291f245806116etiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8515, Column 133: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …oto/2012/10/844b537e76dd318f/c8291f245806116etiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8565, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …o/2012/6/2551eb0abf3a788e/811fa934bf2d506original.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8565, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …o/2012/6/2551eb0abf3a788e/811fa934bf2d506original.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8698, Column 130: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2012/2/ea0d7d22ed362035/32eb57555fcdde97tiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8698, Column 130: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2012/2/ea0d7d22ed362035/32eb57555fcdde97tiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8748, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …2012/10/17fbaa2118a30fbd/393c2aaa29a473baoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8748, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2012/10/17fbaa2118a30fbd/393c2aaa29a473baoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8876, Column 132: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …to/2011/2/e8747e12adbae9cd/6e850e407a7bd543medium.jpg" style="width:231px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8876, Column 132: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …to/2011/2/e8747e12adbae9cd/6e850e407a7bd543medium.jpg" style="width:231px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 8989, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/e4560b0952608bd1/b21ff9eb6ba17a1aoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8989, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/e4560b0952608bd1/b21ff9eb6ba17a1aoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9039, Column 132: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …oto/2013/2/744dc1b8c62f09c5/f520512060f77a0etiny.jpeg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9039, Column 132: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …oto/2013/2/744dc1b8c62f09c5/f520512060f77a0etiny.jpeg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9172, Column 136: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …2013/2/4eaba9346454d92c/6e3956477d49e74coriginal.jpeg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9172, Column 136: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2013/2/4eaba9346454d92c/6e3956477d49e74coriginal.jpeg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9222, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/5531730353fdd18a/92023ba2bf6c973boriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9222, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/5531730353fdd18a/92023ba2bf6c973boriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9337, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …2013/2/896f858e261edc39/4eadcb0328577f13original.jpg" style="height:300px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9337, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2013/2/896f858e261edc39/4eadcb0328577f13original.jpg" style="height:300px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 9349, Column 112: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …://art.news.mn/content/134762.shtml" title="Үнэнд гүйцэгдсэн Эдип хааны мөхөл">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 9415, Column 132: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2013/2/76bc63731c07ac66/0cf35582d03b210ftiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9415, Column 132: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2013/2/76bc63731c07ac66/0cf35582d03b210ftiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9465, Column 132: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2011/10/80ca5f78f7cdfd27/51f2f5ce38bfe3a1tiny.jpg" style="width:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9465, Column 132: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2011/10/80ca5f78f7cdfd27/51f2f5ce38bfe3a1tiny.jpg" style="width:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9592, Column 136: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/b5c9f0bf18d4a3f0/f400d636948b4dc4original.jpg" style="width:219px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9592, Column 136: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/b5c9f0bf18d4a3f0/f400d636948b4dc4original.jpg" style="width:219px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9669, Column 134: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/7428cb4df8fd0b78/8a25834e54409434original.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9669, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/7428cb4df8fd0b78/8a25834e54409434original.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9719, Column 134: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/7b5c673c4bcfde02/b647b6dcc65b89dboriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9719, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/7b5c673c4bcfde02/b647b6dcc65b89dboriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9735, Column 138: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/photo.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9735, Column 138: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/photo.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9852, Column 137: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/9d25251efd49448d/7382e52fced3867boriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9852, Column 137: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/9d25251efd49448d/7382e52fced3867boriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 9902, Column 133: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2013/2/425deaa6404abbf3/ecf1b26cb7f9140atiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9902, Column 133: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2013/2/425deaa6404abbf3/ecf1b26cb7f9140atiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10035, Column 137: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/a4f51c5231fe6b73/a2611ace76b957ccoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10035, Column 137: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/a4f51c5231fe6b73/a2611ace76b957ccoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10085, Column 133: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …hoto/2011/8/5651ae96f02afbb1/1c1cba58f8038ab1tiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10085, Column 133: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …hoto/2011/8/5651ae96f02afbb1/1c1cba58f8038ab1tiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10220, Column 134: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/41bd4f4e6282a7b6/71d93ab24778dc5coriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10220, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/41bd4f4e6282a7b6/71d93ab24778dc5coriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10270, Column 133: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …o/2013/2/ef6eeafafd3c185d/4d12e53ae8b0a0aoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10270, Column 133: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …o/2013/2/ef6eeafafd3c185d/4d12e53ae8b0a0aoriginal.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10286, Column 138: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10286, Column 138: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/interface/news/default/images/video.gif"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10404, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/2013/2/61ac3514004c7e53/3f111e1c4b620390original.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10404, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/2013/2/61ac3514004c7e53/3f111e1c4b620390original.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10454, Column 129: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/photo/2013/2/fa737fad4d387dd8/30267adc9b12catiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10454, Column 129: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/photo/2013/2/fa737fad4d387dd8/30267adc9b12catiny.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10594, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …7111ss11b403tcwfogtgc7b/31gk3diferosiqlmv5clmvsjc.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10594, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7111ss11b403tcwfogtgc7b/31gk3diferosiqlmv5clmvsjc.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10654, Column 135: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …lkdatzv7ntlggf5xzoiau1j/4kdkx1ali0oksbzozj41otx64.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10654, Column 135: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …lkdatzv7ntlggf5xzoiau1j/4kdkx1ali0oksbzozj41otx64.jpg" style="height:58px;"  />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10930, Column 121: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/weather/yicons/34d.png" width="54"/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10930, Column 121: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tp://static.newsresources.info/style/weather/yicons/34d.png" width="54"/></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 10944, Column 44: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                    <input type="text" name="q"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10969, Column 74: reference to entity "site" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …           <a href="http://archive.news.mn/archive.shtml?q=&site=all">Архив</a>

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 257, Column 94: entity was defined here
    …  <a class="" href="http://archive.news.mn/archive.shtml?q=&site=all">Архив</a>
  • Error Line 11246, Column 10: end tag for element "DIV" which is not open
        </div>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

Visitor Analysis

Daily Visitor
  • 8.050 visits
Daily Visitor

In Page Analysis